Artist Statement


My work explores the interplay between music notation and performer. Through recontextualizing the notion of a music score as conceptual art, I blend together elements of traditionally notated scores, text-based scores, and illuminated manuscripts, situating the participant in a space of their own curiosity and creativity. Within my artistic process I use everyday technologies (cellphones, combs, fans) as a foundation for active listening. My goal is creating a performance that resonates with the listener’s curiosity. In my piece Episode 8, the process of chopping, art making, eating, and celebrating are recontextualized as sonic processes. While the sonic properties of these objects have always been present, the piece gives them presence within the listener’s world. Perhaps when an audience member returns home, they will decide to play with their own household objects actively listening to the object’s sonic properties. Beyond the audience, my compositional work also urges performers to play and refocus their embodied listening. I form my music around the concepts of games around embodied listening. In An Anatomical Study on Escape, the practitioner’s breathe together and perform timed actions within one another’s exhaliation. Time becomes encoded in the breath and in the body as a sonic action. The encoding of sonic action allows ensemble playing to be reinforced as a listening process. In creating scores with listening directly stated, I reinforce that even in a space of play and performance we should always be aware and listening to one another. I write music for practitioners and listeners to retrain our ears to actively listen to one another.

As a performer, my main instrument is amplified electric fan. I use a contact microphone to amplify the heartbeat of its motor. The fan’s heartbeat is sound that is dulled away by our ears because of its extraneity to the fan’s purpose—providing air circulation. When I perform on a fan, the audience is reminded that the fan produces a sonic signature and is a more complex object then its initial purpose. It gains a presence, a voice, and becomes a living object. The fan gains layer of anthropomorphized vocality that reverberates through our listening. I use music as an avenue for listening complexly to the objects we interact with. Listening reminds us that these everyday objects are considerable contributors to our personal sonic reality.